Changes between Version 20 and Version 21 of NDF


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Jan 16, 2017, 1:03:37 PM (8 months ago)
Author:
JamesTCurran
Comment:

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  • NDF

    v20 v21  
    88Like in case of MSM description, first we describe generic NDF message structure. Then for each available GNSS we specify signals containing binary data and provide recommendations for data framing.
    99
    10 A GNSS application can use NDF data as it, or they can be preliminary converted into [e.g. already standardized MT 1019, 1020 etc] ephemeris structures for further processing archiving.
     10A GNSS application can use NDF data as is, or it can first convert it into [e.g. already standardized MT 1019, 1020 etc] ephemeris structures for further processing archiving.
    1111
    1212= NDF message =
     
    8282 * 85 bits
    8383
    84 Data senders need to decide whether data with bad checksum is transferred or not. While generally data with a bad checksum may be discarded, in disturbed environments even such data may be useful.
     84Data senders need to decide whether data with bad checksum is transferred or not. While generally data with a bad checksum may be discarded, in disturbed environments even such data may be useful, in particular when parts of the message are common to multiple satellites, or when a portion of the data is already known.
    8585
    8686= NDF as ephemeris transport =
     
    9191Advantages of this approach:
    9292 * Receivers already must support the frame format, so data decoding is no longer special for RTCM messages, but can use already existing algorithms
    93  * No assumptions are taken about which data is required and which not
     93 * No assumptions are taken about which data is required and which not, or what the future use of certain reserved/spare bits might be
    9494 * Changing data formats are handled easily
    9595 * Unique structure for all satellite systems and signal types (even private services, ...)
     96 * New signals, adhering to an existing GNSS standard, but containing different data (e.g. new augmentation signals or pseudolites) can directly employ this standard